This customer had recently moved into a property in Abingdon and got in touch about having the coloured Slate floor tiles in the kitchen cleaned and sealed. There was a big variation in appearance from one end of the kitchen to the other and they had a hunch that the Slate had a lot more colours in it than they could see! I called in to survey the floor and could see that the main issue was the usual problem of the sealer wearing down in the high traffic areas allowing dirt to penetrate and

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I was asked to visit a property in the old Yorkshire village of Bramhope to view a Terracotta conservatory floor. The owners of the property been recently had the floor laid and were unhappy with its appearance. The Terracotta tiles looked faded and washed out and did not have the finish they were expecting; they were also finding it difficult to clean. I viewed the floor and went through with them what the tiler had done. Apparently, he started ok by giving each tile two coats of linseed

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I was asked to visit a property in the old Yorkshire village of Bramhope to view a Terracotta conservatory floor. The owners of the property been recently had the floor laid and were unhappy with its appearance. The Terracotta tiles looked faded and washed out and did not have the finish they were expecting; they were also finding it difficult to clean.

I viewed the floor and went through with them what the tiler had done. Apparently, he started ok by giving each tile two coats of linseed oil which is a traditional approach but not something I would recommend these days. He then laid the floor and grouted it and told the customer that it didn’t need further sealing and that a good wash the next day would get rid of the grout and the dull appearance of the floor. Unfortunately, despite the customer washing the floor nothing he could do improved the appearance of the tiles and they remained dull and un-inviting.

Terracotta Tiled Conservatory Floor Before Cleaning

I was asked my opinion and having come from a tiling background of many years I can tell you his advice was completely wrong. Linseed oil is like a pre-seal so even touching it with greasy or dirty hands will permanently stain the tile so now grout was stuck in the linseed oil ruining the appearance of the terracotta. To clean up the tile and give it the appearance it deserved I would have to remove the grout haze and then seal with a more suitable product. The client was relieved that the floor could be salvaged and was happy to go ahead with my quote.

Cleaning a Terracotta Tiled Conservatory Floor

To remove the grout haze, I applied a 400-grit coarse diamond burnishing pad to the floor which was run over the tiles with a dilution of Tile Doctor Grout Clean-Up. The acidic nature of Tile Doctor Grout Clean-up combined with the abrasive properties of the diamond pad dealt with the unwanted surface grout and helped close the pores of the tile improving its appearance.

After thoroughly rinsing with water and extracting the soil with a wet vacuum the floor looked immediately better. The floor was inspected, and any problem areas retreated using the same process until I was happy with the floor.

Sealing a Terracotta Tiled Conservatory Floor

I left the floor to dry out for two days and then returned to seal with Tile Doctor Seal and Go which is ideal for Terracotta and being a water-based product, it doesn’t leave a smell as it dries. Seal and Go is a specially formulated water-based blend of acrylic polymers that provides both a stain resistant surface seal and a durable low-sheen finish. It restored the natural colour of the terracotta and gave the floor the lovely sheen that the customer originally wanted.

Terracotta Tiled Conservatory Floor After Cleaning

The floor now looks as it should. The client was really pleased with the renovation, the conservatory is now a pleasure to use!

 

Source: Terracotta Tile Cleaning and Sealing Service in Yorkshire

A customer from Oldham contacted us looking for a solution to their very dirty flagstone kitchen floor. They hadn’t lived in the property long and it seems the previous owner had neglected it completely. They had contacted several different stone restoration companies and had received varying advice and quotes that ranged from £500 to £3000. Some companies had said it was a lost cause and others recommended sandblasting. They hired one firm to do the work and were disappointed with the result, as I would have been given the photographs on this page. They had nearly given up but after finding us on-line decided to have one last attempt at having it renovated. I went over to inspect the flagstones and recommended a process we call milling which has proved to be very effective in resurfacing stone floors in the past. It uses very coarse diamond encrusted floor pads which grind away the top layer of stone and unlike sand blasting doesn’t make a huge mess. I ran a small test whilst I

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Granite floor tiles are an elegant and durable addition to any home. Granite is harder and more durable than marble or limestone, but still brings the look and beauty of natural stone to an area. While granite is extremely dense, it can be damaged by repeated exposure to dirt, spills and stains. To help protect the stone, and give you time to wipe these substances up, seal granite floor tiles on a yearly basis.

Things You’ll Need

  • Broom
  • Granite cleaner
  • Clean sponge mop with refill
  • Granite sealer
  • Absorbent cotton cloths

Instructions

  • Sweep the floor thoroughly to remove any dirt or debris resting on the surface. Spray granite cleaner on the tiles once surface dirt has been removed, and mop with a clean sponge attachment to remove any spills or other substances from the tiles. Allow the floor to dry completely.
  • Pour a silicone-based, impregnating sealer onto the floor. Use a mop with a new sponge attachment to spread the sealer over the floor. Saturate the tiles in sealer so that the granite appears wet; look for and cover dry spots to ensure you cover the entire floor. Wait 10 minutes for the sealer to soak into the stone.
  • Dry the granite with absorbent, cotton cloths to remove excess sealer that has not been absorbed. Buff in a circular motion until the stone is dry. Change cloths whenever the cotton stops absorbing sealer to ensure an even finish on the floor.

Tips & Warnings
Well-sealed granite will bead water up off of its surface. When your floor no longer beads water, it is time to reseal it.

 

Source: www.eHow.com

A customer from Colne near Burnley was absolutely frustrated with their newly installed Sandstone floor in the kitchen of their farmhouse. Ever since it was installed it had proved impossible to keep it clean. The customer contacted Tile Doctor in the hope that we could remove the ingrained dirt and make the floor much easier to maintain going forward. I went over to inspect the floor and recommended a course of action. There was a section of stone which had a stain on it due to a pet

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The pictures below are taken from a property in Lancaster which had two areas of tiled flooring that needed work, one Quarry tiled and the other an original Victorian tiled hallway which was over 100 years old. We often get called out to restore broken tiles, missing pieces and then do a clean and seal afterwards to make it all look as good as possible. Tile Doctor covers both areas and our aim is to restore a tiled floor to its best possible condition, ideally making it look new or at least

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