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Monthly Archives: July 2016

This Quarry tiled kitchen floor was in very good condition, with no cracked or broken tiles. However, my customer, who lives in the town of Tutbury, near Burton-on-Trent, was keen to boost the condition of the tiles further through professional maintenance, including a deep clean and a fresh

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This small rough Chinese Slate floor in the kitchen of a house in the village of Cheadle near Stockport in Greater Manchester had not had any sealer put on it for many years and was very grubby (dishevelled as described by the customer) looking even after the customer had tried to clean it. Sealers do take a lot of punishment, especially in a high traffic area such as a small kitchen and will wear off over time and once this happens the floor will start to lose its appearance as dirt

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This small rough Chinese Slate floor in the kitchen of a house in the village of Cheadle near Stockport in Greater Manchester had not had any sealer put on it for many years and was very grubby (dishevelled as described by the customer) looking even after the customer had tried to clean it.

Sealers do take a lot of punishment, especially in a high traffic area such as a small kitchen and will wear off over time and once this happens the floor will start to lose its appearance as dirt becomes ingrained in the stone and it can no longer be cleaned effectively.

Dishevelled Chinese Rough Slate Before Restoration Cheadle

Cleaning the Slate Tiled Floors

As we have to apply a liberal amount of water with this sort of work, the first step was to remove the Kicker boards at the bottom of the Kitchen units and silicone the Kitchen units that were fixed; this stops water seeping in and blowing the MDF allowing us to concentrate on cleaning the Slate without causing any damage.

I started the cleaning process by applying a strong dilution of Tile Doctor Pro-Clean to get rid of the built up dirt and any remaining sealer, leaving it to soak into the Slate before scrubbing the floor with a black scrub pad fitted to buffing machine running at slow speed. Tile Doctor Pro-Clean is a strong alkaline cleaner/stripper that is safe to use on natural stone, we do have stronger products available if required but in this case a strong dilution of Pro-Clean was sufficient to tackle any remaining sealer.

This process gave the Slate and grout lines a good deep clean and after rinsing the floor with water which was then extracted using a wet vacuum I repeated the process on stubborn areas until satisfied the floor was as clean and free of old sealer. Last stage of the cleaning process was to give the floor a final rinse and then get it as dry as possible using the wet vacuum to soak up the moisture.

Sealing Riven Slate Tiles

The floor was quite small so I was able to leave the floor to dry off over lunch time and then on my return managed to get it fully dry with a little heat from a heat gun. The customer wanted a mat finish so once dry I applied Tile Doctor Colour Grow sealer which impregnates into the pores of the natural stone protecting it from within and enhancing the natural colours of the Slate at the same time.

Dishevelled Chinese Rough Slate After Restoration Cheadle

For general cleaning of Sealed stone floors, we recommend the use of a PH Neutral Cleaner as anything with a strong PH will degrade the life of the sealer over time.
 
 
Source: Slate Tile and Grout Cleaning and Sealing Service in Greater Manchester

This Porcelain tiled utility room at a property in Hull had been primarily used as an area for the household dogs, and so had suffered over the years from plenty of wear and tear. Originating in China, Porcelain is a type of ceramic that is known to be quite hard-wearing and durable, however, dogs are known to bring all manner of muck into the house from outside, and it was certainly beginning to show here. The property owner was keen to have the tiles professionally cleaned and sealed,

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This Porcelain tiled utility room at a property in Hull had been primarily used as an area for the household dogs, and so had suffered over the years from plenty of wear and tear. Originating in China, Porcelain is a type of ceramic that is known to be quite hard-wearing and durable, however, dogs are known to bring all manner of muck into the house from outside, and it was certainly beginning to show here. The property owner was keen to have the tiles professionally cleaned and sealed,

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Marble floor polishing is a chore that most do not want to do, but one they can’t escape. There are plenty of marble polish products on the market but these can cause more damage than they are worth. Here are 4 tips for marble floor polishing:

1. Beware Using Acidic Cleaners

Marble is, in essence, a fossil. As crustaceans die, their shells sink to the sea floor. This process happens for millions of years having layers and layers of sea shells constantly compressing. When it’s all said and done you are left with calcium carbonate, or marble. Any cleaner that contains acid will damage and destroy marble. This includes using lemon or lime juice and vinegar, all of which are great all-natural cleaning products – except when it comes to marble floor polishing.

2. Make Your Own Cleaner

Sometimes the best cleaning solution is the one you make yourself. This is not only safe for marble floor polishing, but is easy to make and inexpensive. The recipe is as simple as mixing 3 tablespoons of baking soda to one quart of warm water. That’s all you need to use. Dip a rag in the solution, remove the excess water and then scrub the marble floor. Let the marble floor air dry completely and then wipe down with regular warm water. Use a chamois to wipe up the rinsing water.

3. Avoid Abrasive Cleaners

Never use a floor cleaner unless they are made specifically as a marble floor polishing product. These chemicals are very abrasive and will literally eat away at the marble floor. Instead of turning to these products you can use your own homemade cleaner and marble floor polisher. All you need is a stick of plain white chalk, a rag and some water. Take the chalk and crush it into a very fine powder. Put the rag in some water and wring out the excess so that it is just damp, then dip it into the crushed chalk. Rub the chalk on the marble. Be sure that you apply it smoothly and overlap each stroke. Let the chalk dry a few minutes before rinsing it off with a wet rag that has been wrung out. Let the marble floor air dry completely.

4. On the Spot Cleaning

The process of cleaning your marble floor will also polish them up assuming you haven’t seriously damaged them. When a spill occurs you need to get to it quickly. Sugar is easily removed by using a sponge, warm water and a drop of dish soap. Oil and tomato is removed with a sponge, warm soapy water and a little hydrogen peroxide. Scrub, rinse with water and then buff with a chamois to polish.
 
 
Source: www.DoItYourself.com