Archive

Monthly Archives: July 2017

Bude is a lovely coastal resort in North Cornwall and is home to several B&Bs for visitors to the area. It became popular during the latter half of Queen Victoria’s reign, as sea bathing became a popular trend amongst the upper and middle classes, and as a result there are plenty of period

Read more…

Advertisements

Vinyl flooring offers a durable, beautiful alternative to other flooring types, and it’s easy to install over a a variety of subfloors. To install vinyl flooring over ceramic tiling, check out the guide that follows.

What You’ll Need:
Vinyl
Self-leveling compound
Trowel
Utility knife
Straight edge
Pry bar
Caulk
Caulk gun
Tape measure
Seam sealer
Flooring roller

Step 1 – Prepare the Room
Before you can start installing vinyl over the top of ceramic tile, you must prepare the room. Use your pry bar to remove the baseboards from around the edge of the room.

Smoothing out the Tile

Then, smooth out the ceramic tile before laying the vinyl. Ceramic tile has grout joints that are uneven, so if you were to install the vinyl over top, you would see the grout joints underneath the vinyl.

Use self-leveling compound to fill in the grout joints. Give the compound time to dry before moving on to the installation process.

Step 2 – Apply the Adhesive
Next, apply adhesive to the floor. You can apply most vinyl adhesive with a trowel or roller, but you should look at your manufacturer’s instructions for specifics. Spread the adhesive out over the floor, so that it is thoroughly covered and evenly distributed.

Once you apply the adhesive, allow it time to set up. The adhesive should be tacky to the touch, but it should not come off on your fingers when you touch it.

Step 3 – Lay the Vinyl
After the adhesive has been applied, install the vinyl flooring. Unroll the sheet of vinyl and spread it out over the room. Press the vinyl down into the adhesive as firmly as possible.

Step 4 – Roll the Vinyl
Next, roll the vinyl sheets with a flooring roller. You should take the roller over the entire surface of the vinyl to remove any air from below the vinyl.

Step 5 – Attach Seams
If you have seams between two pieces of vinyl, cut the two edges with a utility knife and a straight edge. Once you put the two pieces of vinyl together, use the appropriate type of seam sealer to attach the two pieces to keep the seam from coming apart in the future.

Step 6 – Allow to Dry
Allow the vinyl a few hours to dry. If you wish, you can put a bead of caulk around the edge of the vinyl floor, so that water cannot get underneath. Then, put your baseboards back. To upkeep your new look, polish the vinyl flooring regularly.
 
 
Source: www.DoItYourself.com

Self-adhesive vinyl tiles are a very popular flooring material commonly used in a number of different applications. You will often find them in kitchens, utility rooms, and bathrooms. However, if you decide that you want to remove these at a later time to change up your decor, a fair amount of work will be involved. Here are the basics for removing these vinyl floor tiles effectively.

What You’ll Need:
Utility knife
Bucket
Water
Scraper
Mineral spirits
Rags

Step 1 – Assess the Condition of the Vinyl Tiles
The first thing that you will want to do is assess the condition of this flooring. Often, the adhesive of these tiles will not be what it was when they were installed; it will start to release its hold on the floor over time. Therefore, you may be able to simply go along and lift them up off the floor. Get down on the ground and try to pull on the corner of a tile anywhere in the room. If it comes up easily, your job will also be very easy. However, if it is stuck pretty well, further measures will be necessary.

Step 2 – Cut the Tiles
If the vinyl tiles are still firmly attached, take a utility knife and start by scoring each one of them. Cut a slit right down the middle, deep enough to get under the surface finish.

Step 3 – Just Add Water
Once you have cut the tiles, get a bucket of water and dump some on each tile. If you know you are on a wood subfloor, make sure that you do not pour out too much water as it could damage the wood underneath. However, if you are on concrete, this should not be an issue.

Thoroughly cover the surface of the vinyl with water, and then allow it to soak in for a while. By cutting the tile and pouring water inside the cut, you will help release the adhesive. This will make it much easier to take up the tile without damage.

Step 4 – Scrape up the Tile
When the water has had a fair amount of time to sit, it is time to start scraping. This is the hardest part of taking up vinyl and there is no easy way around it. Take a long-handled scraper and start working it under the tile. Start on one end of the room, and then work your way across the floor. Try to take up the adhesive with the tile instead of just breaking it off. Many people will scrape up the tile and leave all the adhesive because it is easier. However, you will need to remove the adhesive if you plan on installing anything else in its place.

Step 5 – Clean Up
Once you have scraped up the tile, it’s time to clean up the area. If there is any adhesive still left on the floor, use mineral spirits to clean it off. Dispose of any rags soaked with this chemical properly when you’re finished. As a result of your work, you should have a completely clean subfloor to work with for your next project.
 
 
Source: www.DoItYourself.com

This is the ideal time of year for property owners to not only think about restoring their internal natural stone floor tiles, but also their external tiles. With it being Summer, the weather is warm and dry enough for patio restorations to take place. The photographs below show a recent restoration of a two-year old Sandstone tiled patio at a property on a new build development in Bedford, the country town of Bedfordshire. Sandstone is a naturally porous stone, which does make it more

Read more…

This is the ideal time of year for property owners to not only think about restoring their internal natural stone floor tiles, but also their external tiles. With it being Summer, the weather is warm and dry enough for patio restorations to take place. The photographs below show a recent restoration of a two-year old Sandstone tiled patio at a property on a new build development in Bedford, the country town of Bedfordshire. Sandstone is a naturally porous stone, which does make it more

Read more…

To read more on this topic click here