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Pictured below is an old Quarry tiled floor in the Kitchen of a house in the small farming village of Goostrey. I went over to survey the floor at the request of the owner who felt it was overdue a deep clean and seal. It was a classic floor that suited the kitchen and its Aga well however I’m sure it could tell a story. There were patches of white efflorescent salts in front of the Aga itself and another section of floor where the tiles were a slightly darker shade. I assume some

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Pictured below is an old Quarry tiled floor in the Kitchen of a house in the small farming village of Goostrey. I went over to survey the floor at the request of the owner who felt it was overdue a deep clean and seal. It was a classic floor that suited the kitchen and its Aga well however I’m

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This was a very large natural Slate floor installed throughout much of the ground floor at a property in the East Surrey town of Oxted. The owner was unhappy with the state of the tiles and especially the grout, however she wanted to ensure I would take maximum care around her Baby Grand Piano. If you have read any of my previous articles you will know I am careful and take time to protect anything that could be stained or damaged with a non-marking film. I therefore assured her I would take

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This was a very large natural slate floor installed throughout much of the ground floor at a property in East Surrey town of Oxted. The owner was unhappy with the state of the tiles and especially the grout however she wanted to ensure I would take maximum care around her Baby Grand piano. If you have read any of my previous articles you will know I am careful and take time to protect anything that could be stained or damaged with a non-marking film. I therefore assured her I would take maximum care in her home and that it wouldn’t be a problem.

I surveyed the floor and could see that the previous sealer had long since failed and dirt had penetrated the pores of the stone. This made it difficult to clean the floor effectively and resulted in a continually dull appearance. The grout had also trapped the dirt and had gone black as a result. The cure would be to strip the tile and grout of what was left of the original sealer, deep clean and then reseal. Happy with my quote we set a date for the work to start.

Slate Tiled Floor Oxted Before Cleaning Slate Tiled Floor Oxted Before Cleaning

Stripping and Cleaning Slate Floor Tiles

When I arrived on the appointed day, I discovered that the owner had gone to some lengths to pad the piano with bumble wrap mostly to prevent any airborne chemical or dust damage.

Working in sections I started applying Tile Doctor Remove and Go to the floor which is a powerful coatings remover that would strip what was left of the old sealer from the floor. The product is left on the Slate for about ten minutes before scrubbing it in with a rotary machine fitted with black pad. The machine is run at slow speed to minimise splashing and then the slurry is rinsed off the tiles with water and a wet vacuum.

I inspected the floor at this point to ensure the process was having the right effect and it became evident that there was no integrity in the grouting which was crumbling. This was a major problem and it became clear that the only way to resolve it would be to remove and replace all the grout.

Slate Tiled Floor Oxted Failing Grout

Re-grouting a Large Slate Tiled Floor

Over the next couple of days, I cut out all the existing grout with a special tool. They were large format slate tiles however with most of the ground floor needing to be re-grouted it took some time to complete. Once all the grout was removed, I set about applying fresh grout using a colour that highlighted the Slate tiles better.

Slate Tiled Floor Oxted Replacing Grout

Sealing Tumbled Slate Kitchen Tiles

Once the grout had dried, I was able to start applying a new sealer to the Slate tiles. Slate responds well to Tile Doctor Colour Grow which is an impregnating sealer that protects the stone from within. It’s also a colour enhancing product that really brings out the best in natural stone such as Slate.

Slate Tiled Floor Oxted After Renovation Slate Tiled Floor Oxted After Renovation

Two coats of Colour Grout were sufficient to seal the Slate tiles and I think you will agree the stone floor has come back to life and become a fine setting for the Baby Grand piano.

Slate Tiled Floor Oxted After Renovation Slate Tiled Floor Oxted After Renovation

Before leaving my very happy customer to the enjoy, I left her with customer with a complimentary bottle of Tile Doctor Stone Soap, a neutral and highly reliable cleaner for natural stone floors such as Slate. This will assist her in maintaining the appearance and condition of the tiles going forward. Another satisfied customer!

 

Source: Slate Tile Cleaning and Sealing Service in Oxted, East Surrey

Trisodium Phosphate, also known as TSP, is a powerful chemical cleaner that can be found in most hardware stores. As your fireplace burns, it emits soot and dust particles that are transferred to the stones of your fireplace via the air that circulates throughout the room. TSP is very effective in cleaning this grime that has accumulated on the fireplace stones over a long winter’s use.

Things You’ll Need

Rubber gloves
Goggles
TSP
Water
2 large buckets
2 soft cloths
Scrub brush

Instructions

  1. Wear heavy duty rubber gloves and a pair of goggles. The goggles will protect your eyes from the chemical used to clean you stone fireplace, and the rubber gloves will protect the skin of your hands, as well. TSP is a caustic chemical and can cause burns if it comes in contact with the skin or eyes.
  2. Open up all of the windows in the room that has the stone fireplace that needs cleaning. The fumes from the TSP can be quit overpowering, so it is a good idea to allow fresh air to circulate throughout the room during its use. It is also suggested that pets and children be removed from the room before the cleaning begins.
  3. Mix the TSP in a large bucket with warm water. Pour 1/2 cup of TSP into the bucket and add 3 quarts of warm water. If the fireplace stones are not in need of a deep cleaning, you can further dilute the product by adding more water to the bucket, otherwise the original 3 quarts of water should suffice.
  4. Dip the scrub brush into the bucket of TSP cleaning solution and apply the cleaner to the stones of the fireplace. Scrub the stones until they are free of all dirt, dust and soot. Alternating between dipping the scrub brush into the cleaner and scrubbing the stones should be effective in removing any buildup that has accumulated on the stones during the fireplace’s use.
  5. Wipe down the stones with a soft cloth and a second bucket filled with warm water. Add no soap or detergents to the water, since this bucket will strictly be used for rinsing.
  6. Dry the fireplace stones with a second soft cloth. The stones should be dried thoroughly to prevent mold and mildew from building up in between where the mortar lies. Continue this process as often as necessary.

Tips & Warnings

  • Foaming bathroom cleaners, often used to remove soap scum and other residues from shower walls and tubs, work wonders in cleaning stone surfaces. This can be used in between TSP cleanings and for lighter jobs. Spray the foaming cleaner onto the stones and wipe away the grime.
  • TSP is accepted as a drain disposable chemical. It is advised that the tap be turned on full force to help the chemical flow through the drainage system. Remember to continue wearing the rubber gloves and goggles when disposing of the TSP as well as during cleaning.

 

Source: www.Hunker.com