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Monthly Archives: December 2019

Sloping floors are aesthetically unattractive and uncomfortable to stand and walk on. This problem can be solved with some simple steps.

1 – Foundation Repair
Inspect your foundation for any structural problems such as cracking or sinking. This type of problem will have to be resolved first. You will need to consult with a contractor for the best solution to your problem.

2 – Shim Installation
Shims can be positioned between the sub-floor and the joist. This should level out the floor of the room. Use a level to be sure the floor is sitting properly then nail the sub-floor through the shim and into the joist

3 – Self-Leveling Compound Application
Apply a primer to the sub-floor to make sure that the compound adheres to the sub-floor. Allow the primer to dry then apply the self-leveling compound. Begin at the lowest part of the floor. Carefully spread out the compound to create a flat, level floor.

4 – Floor Joist Replacement
Weak and poor-quality floor joist will not provide the necessary support to a sub-floor. Inspect your floor joists for any damage or weak areas. If you find any evidence of problematic joists, have them replaced.

5 – Sub-floor Replacement

Inspect the sub-floor from underneath for any evidence of sagging or damage. If you find any areas that are damaged, have them replaced. If possible, install a vapor barrier to prevent any further moisture damage.

 

Source: www.DoItYourself.com

This client in Llansamlet wanted to remove their existing parquet flooring as they were aware there was a Victorian tiled floor underneath. They were keen to see if we could clean and refurbish the original tiled floor dating back to the early 1920s that had been covered over in the 70s. Whilst they liked the Parquet floor, having seen their neighbours property they were really keen to recover the floor as an original feature.

I paid a visit to the property and whilst there we lifted a section of Parquet to see how easily they would come up. It was certainly possible to remove the floor, but it was clear the biggest issue would be removing the sticky bitumen that the parquet tiles had been stuck down with. Having said that I knew from previous experience it could be done, although it would be time consuming, so I gave them a price which they were happy with and we scheduled a date to return.

Victorian Tiled Floor Hidden Under Parquet Before Restoration Llansamlet Victorian Tiled Floor Hidden Under Parquet Before Restoration Llansamlet

Cleaning a Victorian Tiled Hallway Floor

On the first day we got to work, starting by protecting the skirting and woodwork to avoid getting bitumen residue on them. Upon removal of the Parquet we got to grips with the bitumen adhesive which was used to stick the parquet to the tile. This didn’t disappoint and proved to be a very stubborn. We found the best way to deal with it was to start by carefully scraping off as much of the solidified bitumen with a blade as possible. This left a residual bitumen layer that could not be fully removed but was weakened with the application of white spirit to bleed the bitumen, a time-consuming exercise but the results are there for all to see.

Once all the bitumen was removed, we used diamond burnishing pads starting on a 400-grit pad and finishing on an 800-grit pad using water to lubricate. This removes and T-Cuts the surface of the floor. The resultant soil was rinsed off the tiles and extracted with a wet vacuum. This was a long task but thankfully the floor underneath was looking pretty good.

Victorian Tiled Floor Hidden Under Parquet During Restoration Llansamlet Victorian Tiled Floor Hidden Under Parquet During Restoration Llansamlet

We then neutralized the floor with water and were careful to make sure there was no bitumen residue remaining. The floor was left for 24 hours to dry off fully before sealing.

Sealing a Victorian Tiled Hallway Floor

The customer specified they wanted a durable satin finish for the floor so I applied Tile Doctor Seal and Go which we recommend for Victorian tiles. This product is specially formulated water-based blend of acrylic polymers which provides both a stain resistant surface seal and a durable low-sheen finish. The seal ensures this heavy traffic area will be protected.

The customer was thrilled with the transformation.

Victorian Tiled Floor Hidden Under Parquet After Restoration Llansamlet

For regular cleaning I recommended the use of Tile Doctor Neutral Tile Cleaner which is formulated for use with sealed surfaces and won’t prematurely break down the sealer which is the problem with many supermarket cleaning products.

 

Source: Victorian Tile Cleaning and Restoration Service in Swansea

Floor joists play an important role in a building’s foundation. But, due to a variety of reasons they may cause the floor to be uneven at certain places. Let us discuss what actions can be undertaken in order to avoid this, or when required solve such a problem.
Moisture

It is important to bear in mind that wood will in time deteriorate due to wear and tear and moisture. So, it is important to primarily make sure that no water leaks or penetrates into the joists. Furthermore there should be an appropriate moisture barrier set in place.

Expansions and Contractions
Due to changes in temperature the wood will expand and contract. This will cause problems such as separation, crowning, cupping or buckling. These problems are common, and can be seen by edges being forced up or down. In turn, the floor will end up uneven in some places. In order to solve these problems the best thing to do is make sure that the temperature is rather level. A good way is to have a humidifier, and to regularly check any defects so as to take the necessary action. You should check for any sources of moisture or excessive dryness.

Maintenance
In order to keep the wood floor in its best condition and avoid unevenness problems, you should sand the floor to provide a smoother finish, especially in areas where there are splinters, lower areas or flaking finishes. Once you have finished sanding the floor, apply wood putty where required. When dry, apply a finish such as stain. Regularly check for similar defects so as to apply the necessary maintenance.

 

Source: www.DoItYourself.com

If you have a ceramic tile concrete floor and you need to remove the tiles, keep in mind that this is not an easy task, especially if you want to save the tiles to reuse in the future. Ceramic tiles tend to break in the process of the removal. You must be very patient when removing tiles from a concrete floor. You should also wear a pair of safety glasses and a dust mask for safety.

What You’ll Need

  • Chisel
  • Gloves
  • Hammer
  • Dust mask
  • Drill driver
  • Putty knives
  • Garden spade
  • Safety glasses

Step 1 – Starting to Remove the Tiles
Before you start removing the ceramic tiles from the concrete floor, cover all openings in the room with plastic sheeting or close all windows and doors. This will keep dust from accumulating in the room. Start removing the ceramic tiles from a doorway in case the tiles are directly installed on the concrete floor. Gently tap the grout lines with a chisel and hammer or a putty knife.

Step 2 – Uninstalling the Tiles
Use the putty knife to cut through the grout and remove as much grout as you can. Put a putty knife under the ceramic tile and drive it with a hammer. Pry in an upward direction until you can lift out the tile.

Make sure that the knife is parallel to the ground when you put it under the tile. Keep in mind that the tile may break or crack in your hands, so make sure that you are wearing appropriate clothing: a dust mask, a pair of safety glasses, a long-sleeved shirt and a pair of gloves.
If you want, you can use a sledgehammer to break the tiles down into pieces and then remove them with a floor scraper. Make sure that the floor scraper has a long handle and get rid of any residue of mastic after peeling the tiles from the concrete floor.

Step 3 – Removing the Cement Board
If you have a cement board on the concrete floor and the tiles are installed on the cement board, you can remove the first few tiles with a putty knife. However, you can break the cement board with a hammer when you see that it is partially visible.

Insert a straight-edged garden spade beneath the cement and pry in an upward direction until you have removed the tiles and the cement board. Keep a trash can or bucket near you so that you can easily throw away large pieces of debris. On the other hand, as for the dust and small pieces of debris, you can use a shop vacuum to dispose of them.

However, if the cement board is attached with screws, you should remove the tiles first and then the screws. You should never try to try to remove the cement board in this case because it is not only difficult but you can damage the concrete floor and leave the holes of the screws on the surface.

 

Source: www.DoItYourself.com

The photos below are of a Polished Porcelain tiled floor at a house in the new Telford Lawley Village development. When the house was built my customer had specified large format White glazed Porcelain floor tiles on the ground floor and had insisted on the use of a matching white Epoxy Grout. The developer agreed to lay the tiles but refused to use Epoxy Grout (which is very resilient but also tricky to work with). As a result, the customer hired someone else to grout the floor. Epoxy

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The photos below are of a Polished Porcelain tiled floor at a house in the new Telford Lawley Village development. When the house was built my customer had specified large format White glazed Porcelain floor tiles on the ground floor and had insisted on the use of a matching white Epoxy Grout. The developer agreed to lay the tiles but refused to use Epoxy Grout (which is very resilient but also tricky to work with). As a result, the customer hired someone else to grout the floor. Epoxy

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A family living in Guildford were in touch recently about restoring the appearance of their Ceramic tiled shower and bathroom. They were about to put the property up for sale and were concerned the grubby grout might put off potential buyers. First impressions do count so renovating a bathroom or kitchen before selling is a really good idea and will help you achieve a better price. In this case the Ceramic tiles were dirty and black with mould in places which looked unhygienic and

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